Bradgate Park excavations to be revealed at archaeology discovery day

Free public event to explore new findings at popular attraction on Sunday 3 July. Members of the public are invited to learn about the latest archaeological discoveries being made by our University’s Archaeology fieldschool at Bradgate Park, Leicestershire, during a free family Open Day on Sunday 3 July between 11.00am – 4.00pm. Academics, professional archaeologists and students…

Evidence of Ice Age hunter-gatherers excavated in Bradgate Park

New excavation in Bradgate Park, Leicestershire, saves flint artefacts from impact of erosion. After being hidden for nearly 15,000 years, the lives of Ice Age hunter-gatherers who migrated to Europe to benefit from warmer climes are being revealed in an archaeological dig at a very rare site in Bradgate Park, Leicestershire. The Bradgate Park Trust…

Archaeology discovery day to unearth Bradgate Park’s mysteries

Free public event to explore new findings at popular attraction to take place on Saturday 27 June. Come and learn about the latest archaeological discoveries being made at Leicestershire’s Bradgate Park by School of Archaeology and ULAS archaeologists during a free family Open Day on Saturday 27 June, between 11.00am – 4.00pm. The many mysteries…

Archaeological fieldschool launched at Bradgate Park

Archaeologists set to unearth secrets from the Stone Age through to the Second World War at popular county attraction. The many mysteries of Leicestershire’s 850-acre deer park are set to be explored by archaeologists at the University of Leicester over the next five years with the launch of a fieldschool at Bradgate Park. The public…

Medieval hospital revealed in Leicester’s Cathedral Gardens

In 2013 and 2014 archaeologists from ULAS carried out a series of watching briefs during the construction of ‘Cathedral Gardens’ a new public open space located to the south and west of Leicester Cathedral. As part of this development, various ground-works were undertaken within both the graveyard of Leicester Cathedral and the St Martins House…

Secrets beneath Jubilee Square revealed

In 2013 and 2014 archaeologists from ULAS carried out a series of watching briefs during construction of Leicester’s new Jubilee Square. The site, at St Nicholas Place is in the historic heart of the Roman city and later medieval borough. In the Roman period much of the site was occupied by the southern and eastern…

‘Grant me the carving of my name’

What a week! Leicester rose to the occasion and reburied King Richard III with style; a perfect blend of solemnity and pageantry, mixing the old and the new with dignity and honour. I’m not one for writing a sentimental eulogy for the project that has dominated the last two and a half years of my…

King Richard III’s mortal remains depart from University of Leicester

In a short and moving ceremony the University of Leicester and guests marked the departure of Richard III’s mortal remains after nearly three years of research and guardianship. Those present included many of the research team and their families – from the volunteers who helped during the excavation to the lab technicians who worked tirelessly…

The house that Herrick built

By now, the history of the Grey Friars and its role as the burial place of King Richard III is widely known, but what happened after the friary closed in 1538? Over the next 30 years the church was pulled down and the remaining buildings were left to gradually decay, providing a useful quarry of…

Timelapse offers unique insight into Richard III burial site dig

The University of Leicester has released a unique insight into the archaeological dig that has captured the imagination of the world, with new film footage of a second excavation at the site where the remains of King Richard III were discovered in 2012. The sequence – an 11 minute time-lapse video – documents the month-long…

FIND SPOTLIGHT: The Grey Friars tile

This late 13th century floor tile is one of many found during the excavation of Grey Friars in Leicester in 2012. The tile is of a ‘Stabbed Wessex’ style, commonly found across the English midlands, and it would have originally been laid in the chancel of the friary church, most likely in the choir area….